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What's Good for the Goose, is it Good for the Gander?
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What's Good for the Goose, is it Good for the Gander?

Ok, so geese don't have anything to do with horses really, but considering the saying it has relevence in Horse Training. 

There are literally hundreds (maybe more) different training methods out there today & if you do a search you'll see what I mean. Some even come with videos or how to's. 

I'm not a "one way" trainer. I'm an eclectic trainer & truthfully, most good trainers are eclectic. Most of the time a trainer's job is to teach a horse basic skills in order to have a solid foundation. Then that horse is either sold for someone to finish the way they want, or given back to the person so they can ride without the previous problems. However, if you're taking your horse to a trainer, you should be trained with your horse so you know how to cue him & work him so he responds to you. Most people don't do that, most folks take their horses to trainers & use their methods on the horse, which may or may not work. The reason I say this is because the trainer you take your horse to may not ride like you, may not handle your horse like you do, may not use the same cues as you do. Therefore there is a communication block between your newly trained horse & you. 

Now that's not to say that most trainers don't use the same cues as virtually other trainers. Just consider the possibility that your trainer might use leg cues, pressure & release, & you use body weight shifts. 

When one training method doesn't work for you, what do you do? Do you give up? Do you seek out a trainer's advice? Do you say this horse just won't learn what I'm teaching because he's set in his ways? 

I have read many different teaching methods by the Parelli's, Buck Brannaman, Clinton Anderson, etc. Natural Horsemanship in general is a good way to go. Each teach the same thing, just a bit differently. There is the Native American way, the Cowboy way & then there are the I'm not sure what I'm doing, but I'm going to force my horse to do it anyways kind of way. 

Whenever I see someone asking for help, I'll get as much information about the situation as I can, asses it as best as I can & offer a few different suggestions for the person to try. If that doesn't work, I'll research some more, rely on my past experiences of what worked & didn't & suggest more things to try. There is not a one size fit all for every horse. They are as versatile as dialects in language & you have to learn as many of these different ways of training in order to progress your horse to the next level. Sometimes if you are way over your head, going to a trainer is going to be the way to go. Even I get over my head at times, but it doesn't discourage me from trying something new or different. 

I don't pretend to know everything about horses & training them. There will always be something new to learn or a different way of teaching the lessons. What drives me crazy is seeing someone say to someone else that there may not be anything that can be done.... there's always something you can try until you find what works. People want positive reinforcement & encouragement, not Well this is the end of the line because your horse is barn, herd, buddy sour now so just give up & let him be.

I hope that many will realize, what's good for the goose, isn't always good for the gander, but there is always more than one way to teach a horse something new, or change their behaviors. 

 

Thank you for reading my blogs. I appreciate all comments & votes. Have a Blessed Day! :) 

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  1. naturegirl
    Several good points here. I would add this goes for quite a lot of animals, too. I wish more people understood this. Voted! My new one is up 'More on Naturopathic Care.
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    1. Rene Wright
      Rene Wright
      Thank you.. I agree also. Education is free, but so many are too arrogant to accept it. :(
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  2. jst4horses
    I thought many good points here as well. I have a horse I was given when her young owner failed to show up to learn how to handle her. What good did it do that she behaved perfectly for me? But, bucked, bit and kicked her owner. Her family was tired of paying huge board and bills for her where they kept her, and just gave her to me. I have never forced tying with her. Her history includes at least two horrifying events in which she was tied and beaten and injured enough to require a vet. She just can not stand it. She will stand completely still for the vet and shoer as long as i hold her, and recently our other trainer can get her to stand quiet and happy while having vet or shoer work done. I still play with her, and work on pushing her envelope, by putting her lead rope around things, but never tying it, She will stand as long as I ask her at the hitching rail, as long as the rope is just thrown over it. The point: what would be the use of forcing everyone's unasked for advice and forcing her and fighting with her. We trailer her free, with only a short lead line hanging down and usually put her in the middle stall of the slant to keep her happy with her friends. But it is not the where, it is the tying that makes her so upset. So, I just let her live with as much as she can stand based on her history. On the other hand, my three month old filly is now a big girl, taking her foal imprinting in to the development stage and learning what that silly halter and lead rope was about on the day she was born. She is funny. She runs up and looks at us with her little halter and lead rope and runs off again when we do not take it off. Next week, her first big girl bath!
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    1. Rene Wright
      Rene Wright
      You have given the horse a chance at a new life, far different than the one she had & that is so awesome. Understanding where the horse came from & it's bad past & doing things differently with her ie: not tying her comes from experience & patience. Those are HUGE things & so many people just don't get it. :( Horse do not learn like dogs, cats, people.. but what they learn often stays with them for life especially if they pay the price for human ignorance & stupidity. To be quite frank & honest, I don't know what I would do if I ever saw someone in person beating on a horse, but chances are God won't put me in that position because He knows I'd more than likely end up in jail. At least I pray.... God please don't ever let me see that situation, ever. Good luck with your filly :) Though I don't think you'll need luck... I'll bet she does fabulous with her bath. Thank you also for sharing your experience & stories.
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