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Trail Riding Safety Tips
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Trail Riding Safety Tips

Hello again Of Horse Audience. Sweetsie and I (Gucci) would like to give some tips on Trail Riding Safety. (You remember we are the Pony Bloggers, “How to Treat an Abscess” and “Barrel Racing Issues from the Horse’s Perspective”). We both enjoy trail riding and our person’s make sure it is a major part of our lives. Trail riding really creates a strong bond between us horses and our riders. Overcoming strange obstacles together is important in our trust relationship towards our human friends. And trails are great for our minds-too much ring work only can make us very sour and its not in our general make up to stay in circles our entire lives. However, with trail riding comes responsibility and this is what Sweetsie and I want to tell you about. First make sure as riders you have control at all of our gaits in the ring before you even think about heading outside of it. Spend some ring work on desensitizing us to scary situations. All equipment and tack must be in good condition, checked and fitted properly. Make sure we, as horses, are fit enough for the type of trail ride you have planned. It spells disaster when persons take us out without a plan and when we are not ready. Remember us horses rely on you for that. Never trail ride alone-stay in a buddy system. Stay on marked trails and parks. Also, never forget to tell someone where you are heading. Keep cell phones on your person never attached to the saddle. The phone will due you people no good if we run away with it. Our persons also wear wristbands with their personal information on it (Ride Alert Bands) and Sweetsie and I each have a tag on our trail bridles with our personal information on them as well. And there is even a note in our persons riding helmets in case for some reason the tags and bands are not noticed. This may sound like a lot of work, but its easy and better to be prepared. Never forget outside of the rings is an entire world of obstacles, critters, and dangers. But, outside of a ring is where we belong. We are very sensitive sorts of animals and know danger way before you folks do, so trust us to keep you covered in that department. And don’t forget to fly spray us if its buggy out there. And the most important tip from both of us is to HAVE FUN! We sure do love it-love it with us and make it a part of your horse’s routine! Happy Trails Everyone!!!!

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  1. jst4horses
    Thank you for this well done article, and for the reminder to ride your horse in the ring. I would like to add, take your horse for walks. It is actually called Lateral Lounging. Just go out and walk where you will be riding. One day, the day the garbage truck decides to upload a dumpster as you walk past, it will make sense to you that those long walks with your horse were worth it. The lady with the baby who wakes up in that stroller and starts screaming is SO much easier to handle on the ground than when your horse is climbing a telephone pole because the baby starts screaming behind him. Our horses, we had NO idea, were so well trailer broken that they would just load on up if they saw an open trailer door........luckily we found out on a Lateral Lounging walk, not onboard. I had one horse that had NO fear of any kind of snake, even a rattler on the trail, he just said, OH, you want to walk away from it, OK, and all was calm...........but even walking he had a fear of hoses that he never did fully overcome in the thirteen years we spent together before he died. But walking all around hoses certainly calmed him from the first time I found out as he turned into a rodeo bronc at the site of a hose. And I also want to add, please have the brains and kindness to others in the community to get down and lead a horse that has simply lost it...........I have jumped out of my truck many times and gone out and grabbed the halter or bridle of a stormy, rage throwing horse in a busy street where the rider is stuck on the idea that to get down will let the horse "win" . I do not know what those riders thought they were "winning" but getting piles of complaints to the Mayor and county supervisors to get rid of the horse trails, and scaring joggers and drivers half to death did not seem to be "winning" and those I saw thrown, and I had to chase down their horses dead running back to the barn on paved streets was surely not great for their horses either.............so please all, remember to be safe, and also a good horsey citizen out on the trails.
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