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The Truth About Being a Barn Manager
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The Truth About Being a Barn Manager

I can’t tell you how many comments and questions I’ve read from people who love horses and are thinking about changing their career path and become a Barn Manager. I thought it might be time to let these people know what it’s really like before they make a life changing decision.

First of all let me say that every Barn Manager position is different. This is just a general overview of my experience combined with others that I have worked with.

Now on to the important stuff!

Let me get this out. As a Barn Manager (BM), nine times out of ten you will spend more time working with people than with horses. That’s right I said it. This is a people job not a horse job. If you want a job working mostly with horses look into exercise riding or starting young horses.

While a BM does spend most of their day in the barn ordering feed and shavings, tacking up, cleaning, scheduling lessons, teaching lessons, you don’t usually get that quality one on one time that made you fall in love with horses in the first place. I spent several years after college as a BM for a local barn with a big lesson program and an even bigger summer program and let me tell you – although I really wanted to buy my own horse (I sold mine while in college), I was grateful that I hadn’t because the last thing I wanted to do at the end of the day was work another horse.

I’m not trying to convince you that it is some horrible job – not at all! On the contrary, I loved being a BM and I still miss my lesson girls every day. But it certainly was not what I expected when I took the job and I think it's only fair that I share that with others thinking about taking this kind of position.

My typical schedule was:

7:30 AM: Feed and Turn out/ Bring In - Hay

8:00 AM: Teach Lesson 1

9:00 AM: Teach Lesson 2

10:00 AM: Work Horse in Training

10:30 AM: Work Horse in Training

11:00 AM: Hay

11:30 AM: Teach Lesson 3

12:30 PM: Lunch

1:00 PM: Teach Lesson 4

2:00 PM: Work Horse in Training

2:30 PM: Hay – Clean Barn/Tack

3:30 PM: Teach Group Lesson 1

4:30 PM: Teach Group Lesson 2

5:30 PM: Teach Group Lesson 3

6:30 PM: Feed and Turn Out/ Bring In – Hay

7:00 PM: Clean up Barn and Close Up

7:30 PM: Go Home!

As you can see by the end of the working day there was not much daylight left for worrying about your own horse. Working the horses in training is not riding for fun, it's working on whatever that pairing (student and horse) need to be accomplishing, and after teaching 7 lessons you don’t want to walk anywhere or hear yourself talk anymore!

Like I said all positions are different. I just want to make it clear that your time and energy will revolve more around the people at the barn than the horses. Who wouldn’t love to be a BM who spends all day loving on ponies, hanging out with other horse people (sans barn drama), and getting some quality riding time in? I sure would and I’m sure that position is out there but unfortunately they are few and far between. If you do hear of one, let me know!

I ended up leaving the position for many reasons. But the thing that really stuck with me was how the actual experience differed from what I expected. I would consider taking a BM position again but only under the right circumstances.

What was your Barn Management experience like? Or have you ever dreamed of working in the horse industry? Share with us below!

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Leave a Comment

  1. autumnap
    autumnap
    Voted! I think I'll stick to dressage judging and writing books!! x
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    1.  Rachel at The Warmblood Horse
      Rachel at The Warmblood Horse
      Thank you!
      Log in to reply.
  2. shumes
    shumes
    Voted up! I've never been a barn manager but I did help run a stable for a while. I thought that was tiring enough :)
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    1.  Rachel at The Warmblood Horse
      Rachel at The Warmblood Horse
      Thanks!
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  3. Nancy Richards
    I am a barn manager, and it isn't all fun and games when it comes to boarders. Some can be so rude and have no regard for another person's property. I have come across a few of them, and it is very difficult to deal with especially when they have no respect for other people to begin with. And their attitudes and behavior transfer to their horses. If the boarders have no manners, their horses are bound to reflect them. Horses with no manners are frustrating to deal with as they can be dangerous. I was almost trampled a few times because the owner said her horse always ran into the barn and was never led in. I love working with horses, and have tried to work with the horses made crazy/rude by their owners but every time it gets undone when they come out. I have two horses of my own who I am around twice a day seven days a week, and they are a joy to be around.
    Log in to reply.
    1.  Rachel at The Warmblood Horse
      Rachel at The Warmblood Horse
      It seems that boarders are always a problem! Not all boarders, but it seems that every barn has a few that give the rest a bad name. You are absolutely right that horses are a reflection of their owners, they are like children, teach them respect and they will treat you with respect, teach them that its ok to be rude and thats exactly what they are going to do.
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  4. scriber57
    scriber57
    You should have looked into being a cowboy at a ranch. I have a friend that rides his own horse(s) every day to check on how the cows are doing, fix fences, doctor cows/horses and whatever else needs to be done. But at least he is riding every day.
    Log in to reply.
    1.  Rachel at The Warmblood Horse
      Rachel at The Warmblood Horse
      I would love to do that but unfortunately there aren't many paying cowboy positions in south Georgia. I need to move out west I think!
      Log in to reply.

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