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Ten things every horse owner must know about their four legged best friend
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Ten things every horse owner must know about their four legged best friend

Horses become part of our family unit very quickly. Every horse just like every person has a different personality.

1) Just like there are bad people there are bad horses. A rider's personality may clash with a rider's so be sure to spend plenty of time with a horse before deciding to bring them home. Horses all learn differently so we must use patience .A technique that worked with one horse may not work with another.

2) Horses with proper care and training will readily accept a human as a leader. Horses have a highly developed language. It takes time for one to learn to read horses and communicate with them on their own terms. Remember that being a 'Horse Listener' is more productive than being a 'Horse Whisperer.'

3) Remember that interaction is training. You must be consistent with your interaction and your training. Never alter your interaction or training techniques because your surroundings change. Here are easy and successful steps one can take when teaching your horse a routine:

a. Break the routine down into actions. b. Get him to perform the desired actions. c. Combine the actions into a routine. d. Associate the routine with a cue. - The initial cue will be explicit and the final cue will be implied.

4) Remember that you can't train your horse if you are unable to catch him! You cannot teach a horse to load if you cannot lead him. Before you train him to load you must first teach him the following; a. Respect - Stay out of my space. b. Give to implied pressure c. Lead on either shoulder or behind me. d. Give the hindquarters and on the fore. e. Stand still on "WAIT". f. "Go Forward". g. Back up with a tug on his tail.

5) While training be nurturing and patient. Horses learn in small increments. Keep your training sessions brief. You cannot train a horse in a day. Two thirty minute sessions, one in morning and one in the evening are better than hours of intensive training. Keep in mind that horses will get better, than worse, than better with each session so do not be impatient. Don't get mad or frustrated.

6) Horses are split brained, you must train both the left and right sides. Horses do not make logical "If then" associations.

If you teach your horse to "keep your distance" at a walk, then you must teach it again at a trot, and again at a canter.

7) Horses will be most comfortable if the preform their routines in familiar surroundings. Because horses are prey animals 'different' means danger.

8) Horses never forget and are strongly empathic. Like people horses do distinguish between people. It is easier when training a horse to work with a blank slate than it is reprogramming an all ready trained horse.

9) Never ask your horse to do something that you are unsure he can do instead train hi to do it then make the request.

10) Always remember that horses are not possessions, but members of your extended family. Show them only love and respect...horses never forget.

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  1. naturegirl
    Nice post! I voted!
    Log in to reply.
    1. Tammy Marie Rose
      Tammy Marie Rose
      Thank you!
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  2. chloe
    Great article! Voted up!
    Log in to reply.
  3. evgr
    Thanks for sharing!
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  4. Diamond Turner
    Diamond Turner
    Your comment "horses never forget" is extremely true! Their such an amazing creature that only a selective group of people truly understand.
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  5. jst4horses
    I recommend "join up" or "partnering" from natural horsemanship clinics. Once your horse knows what that means it is often lifesaving. One day we were at the local public arena, several of us, our horses running loose. Then we saw a car slam to a stop, police emerge with guns drawn and they ran down a nearby wall. We realized fast, that if they had guns on their side, there were probably guns on the other side. I cued my horses, they came, we left fast and went on down the street to safety. Some of the riders had to leave their horses. They could not catch them. Even in a dire emergency, my horses knew I meant it, and it was imperative. That is what all the training in "join up" is about to me. Many of my clients want stallions. We train them "not your mare" means stop it. NOW. And they do. The more clinics you attend, even without your horse, the more you will learn. You will form your own way and you and your horses will benefit. Buck Brennaman says that you do not have to say "wait, I have to get my legs to come on this way" and you should be sure that you do not have to say "wait until my horse wants to come on this way" either. Pat Parelli says, no bad horses, just bad human experience. I have trained out some horses that I had the time to encourage through some really bad things that happened to them (broken bones types of things for some) but have gained their trust and retrained them, and even gotten them to accept others. Pat said, it is not an accomplishment that YOU can get the horse to do something, or accept YOU, it is an accomplishment when you have helped him to trust others and do the right thing every time. He has an amazing video of a stud that was so abused (kindly of course) that he was really deadly. In the end, Pat and others can handle him simply. Learn, and grow with horses. Monty Roberts has some great documentaries as well on horses with issues. Nada at Return to Freedom has classes that I loved in wild horse life and how to live in the horse chain without getting killed. It is an exciting moment to go out on the range with her, among real wild horses and know they are accepting you there. There are many exciting clinics to learn more from and to share what you know.
    Log in to reply.
  6. jst4horses
    I recommend "join up" or "partnering" from natural horsemanship clinics. Once your horse knows what that means it is often lifesaving. One day we were at the local public arena, several of us, our horses running loose. Then we saw a car slam to a stop, police emerge with guns drawn and they ran down a nearby wall. We realized fast, that if they had guns on their side, there were probably guns on the other side. I cued my horses, they came, we left fast and went on down the street to safety. Some of the riders had to leave their horses. They could not catch them. Even in a dire emergency, my horses knew I meant it, and it was imperative. That is what all the training in "join up" is about to me. Many of my clients want stallions. We train them "not your mare" means stop it. NOW. And they do. The more clinics you attend, even without your horse, the more you will learn. You will form your own way and you and your horses will benefit. Buck Brennaman says that you do not have to say "wait, I have to get my legs to come on this way" and you should be sure that you do not have to say "wait until my horse wants to come on this way" either. Pat Parelli says, no bad horses, just bad human experience. I have trained out some horses that I had the time to encourage through some really bad things that happened to them (broken bones types of things for some) but have gained their trust and retrained them, and even gotten them to accept others. Pat said, it is not an accomplishment that YOU can get the horse to do something, or accept YOU, it is an accomplishment when you have helped him to trust others and do the right thing every time. He has an amazing video of a stud that was so abused (kindly of course) that he was really deadly. In the end, Pat and others can handle him simply. Learn, and grow with horses. Monty Roberts has some great documentaries as well on horses with issues. Nada at Return to Freedom has classes that I loved in wild horse life and how to live in the horse chain without getting killed. It is an exciting moment to go out on the range with her, among real wild horses and know they are accepting you there. There are many exciting clinics to learn more from and to share what you know.
    Log in to reply.
  7. mrsboat99
    I Have been working with my newest horse Levi,,I have had him siince last May,,getting rid of my mare after she threw me,,and while I was laid up mending my broken body,,she wouldn't let anyone on her,,she has alway been a spirted horse,,the lead mare,,but had never tried to throw me or hurt me,, but everytime someone would ride herwhile I couldn't she thew them,,so my husband got me the sweetest geldng quarter horse,,and he is eager to learn,,and I'm learning too,,always grateful to learn more tips about being the leader of my horse,,We are commng along nicely
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