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Should You Get Insurance for your Horse?
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Should You Get Insurance for your Horse?

Should you get insurance for your horse? Why would you need insurance for this beloved animal? There are many reasons to apply for it and pay the monthly premiums. There are also many locations and objects that can be insured as well as the horse, but be included in the same policy. Here is how it works.

What can you insure, under your horse’s policy? For starters, in addition to insuring the actual animal, you can actually insure your farm or equestrian club. The stable can be placed under this policy, too, as well as any equipment you own. You can receive a pension through this policy and insure your residence. If you own an equestrian or riding school, you can add that as well. You have the option to cover your breeding projects. And, of course, if you have employees such as an instructor, a trainer, or a horseshoer, they can be covered, too!

These insurance policies are interesting because they help cover you in case of an accident or a natural disaster. They also help you out in case of theft or even if your horse needs medical care, including surgery. If the rider dies accidentally, that is also included. If you have any fees to pay in case of mortality, that will be repaid. All equipment is insured, so if anything happens to it, you can turn to your insurance broker. Plus, if anyone tries to sue you because something happened to them while they were riding your horse or caring for it, you will be protected.

Now, be careful because some policies only cover until the horse reaches a certain age, so read all of the details, including the fine print, carefully. At times, race horses or rodeo animals won’t be covered, either. Whatever happens to the horse, whether it is an accident, an illness, or if it dies of natural causes or because the vet judged that it was time to put it down, you will receive compensation for it. However, if an investigation needs to be carried out because a criminal case is suspected, such as an injury done deliberately to the animal by the family of the insured, or that the horse was put down without prior approval by the insurance company, then you may not receive the amount owed.

All in all, a horse can be insured – like humans, cars and homes. So do a bit of research and find out what your needs are!

 

Photo credit: flickr.com

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Leave a Comment

  1. pftsusan
    pftsusan
    Thank you for writing about insurance. It's needed for all living beings today.
    Log in to reply.
  2. liz48170
    I took out a policy for my 12 yr old Mare as I was leaving town for some time and wanted to make sure she would be cared for (colic surgery if needed) if I could not be reached. I gave a copy to my VET and Stable Manager. My horse has never had an injury and I have owned her since she was a babe, but wow 3 weeks after the policy kicked in, she came up lame. My own VET found the issue (P ligament pulled) but said he could not tell how bad the injury was, or provide a rehab program, gave me bute, put her on stall rest, and take her to the local school Vet School. Had I not had the insurance, I would have balked as the costs are pretty high. At the Vet School, we had an expert perform 3 hours of examinations, X-Rays and Ultrasounds. We left with new pain medication and a firm rehab plan. My bills to date are over $1400, and I expect another $500 - $1000. I should mention she did not appear lame after the first month of stall rest, so I probably would not have spent this amount of money. I am really glad I did, as the vet told me with the 9 mo rehab program, she most likely would be good as new (95% chance) and had I ridden her or placed her in a field to run around, I would have had chronic lameness or a horse to put down due to pain. The policy was $500, $7500 of major medical, $7500 for theft or death. Well worth the $500 if you love your horse. Some that do not, would have taken the horse to auction as wow these vet bills add up really fast
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