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Saving Wild Horses in Australia
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Saving Wild Horses in Australia

Australia’s wild horses known to everyone as the Brumbies are facing extinction. Just like wild horses that roam different continents, the Brumbies are an endangered species. Brumbies are mainly concentrated to the outback, in Queensland and Northern Australia.

Being wild horses, Brumbies have become accustomed to the outback and know how to take care of themselves. To survive in the wild, the Brumbies live in herds, creating a stable structure and rules that keep them alive. Brumbies body language shows that the horses are always alert and have the strength to either stand and defend their ground or run away when they sense danger. Being agile, fast and having healthy hooves the Australian wild horse has adapted to its environment quite well.

The name Brumbies comes from the name of one of the early settlers in Australia, Sergeant James Brumby. Brumby left behind his horses when he transferred from Australia to Tasmania. The animals left behind learned how to take care of themselves in the outback, adapted to the environment, and became famous for their resilience and endurance. Due to their personality and traits, Brumbies were used by the armed forces in the both World Wars.

An Endangered Species

Fast forward to the 21st century and Brumbies are sadly more endangered today that ever. As the Australian government does not protect them, hunters are contributing to the dwindling numbers of the wild horse. Shooting them down for sport and taking the dead carcasses to slaughterhouses is the order of the day. Due to the government’s neglect, it is now impossible to know the actual number of horses remaining in the wild. Speculations suggest that there maybe just a few thousand horses that roam the outback. But the numbers are said to be dwindling fast annually due to human cruelty.

Hunters use modern technology to hunt and maim these beasts. Helicopters and drones are used to herd together for shooting Brumbies. The government doesn’t feel compelled to protect the wild horses, and only a handful of horse rescue organizations have come to the rescue to try and save the Australian wild horse.

Why Saving the Brumbies Is a Good Thing

If the government will take no action, the future of the Brumby looks bleak. Until now, and maybe for just a few years to come, Northern Australia is a vast wild area. However, human settlements are coming up fast, and this is proving to be bad for the wildlife in the North.

Studies show that Brumbies are an important horse breed. Crossbreeding with stable horses has led to the birthing of a more fastidious, will-power, and renewed temperament domestic horse. If allowed to thrive, the Australian wild horse could be the key to creating a more energized hybrid for the farm and the race track.

Organizations that champion the protection of the Brumbies are fighting for the following rights:

  • Humane Brumby population control
  • The abolishment of unlicensed and uncontrolled shooting and butchering of Brumbies
  • Maintenance of the pure Brumby genetics for future generations
  • Creation of protected regions to maintain and control the Brumby population 
  • Promotion of an adoption program

Experts advise that apart from the creation of sanctuaries, the government should champion Brumby adoption programs. Families and farms can be assessed before they adopt a Brumby and they can then help to protect and preserve the breed.

In Conclusion

Brumbies are a wild and tough horse breed. Without human intervention, Brumbies have adapted to the wild and thrive among the other wild animals in the outback. However, humans have now led to the sharp decline in herd numbers. Organizations are rising to the occasion and fighting to keep Brumbies from going extinct. Without Australia’s government help, these organizations are educating people and championing Brumbies rights.

 

Image courtesy of Google Images "free for commercial use" section.

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