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New Safety Device Could Save Your Life
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New Safety Device Could Save Your Life

I listened to the news this morning and learned with sadness of former racing driver Michael Schumacher’s skiing accident. Mr Schumacher sustained a serious head injury and currently lies in a medically induced coma, fighting for his life. Fortunately, prompt medical assistance and evacuation to the hospital saved his life.

The incident put me in mind of a riding accident I had several years ago. The young horse I was riding bolted, and I was left with no alternative but to bail out or risk both of us crashing to the ground. Although I fell correctly, I still broke my arm very badly and walked the half mile back to the stables with my fractured arm in a makeshift sling. I was riding alone at 7am; I saw no-one and my mobile phone was useless as there was no signal in the area where I was riding. I wondered what would have happened to me if I’d broken my back, been knocked unconscious or suffered a serious head injury, like poor Mr Schumacher.

Many of us ride alone, either out hacking or at home in the arena and trust to luck that someone will be on-hand to call the emergency services if we were to need them. In fact, statistics produced by the British Horse Society show that there are way upwards of 200 serious horse-related accidents every year. But now a new safety device can send riders’ vital information direct to emergency responders without the need for a phone call.

The device is called the ‘PAL’ Emergency and comes in the form of a card which can be carried in your pocket or as a pair of stickers you can attach to your riding hat. Both the card and the stickers contain your details and medical history. This information can be transmitted straight to any type of mobile or cell phone via a microchip or bar code, which can actually be read by a Smartphone! You can also load your horse’s details onto the card too if you wish. The technology is remarkably affordable too at around £19.75.

The bar (or QR) code will safely deliver your information even without a mobile phone signal or internet connection; crucial if you are riding alone in a remote location. There are similar items on the market, but all are reliant on someone at the accident scene calling a number on the rider’s sticker, saddle tag or wrist band.

For more information, visit www.emergencypal.com.

More about rider, device, emergency, PAL, safety

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  1. jst4horses
    I know a lot of riders will squal, scream, shout, swear. I use a cell phone when out on the trail, and even in the stable. I heard a sound, knew it was not good, and with a bad heart, not supposed to run, ran down and found a young barrel rider completely flat on the ground having had a horrible top speed fall. I called 911. I went in to see if I could do anything before they arrived AFTER securing the horse so he did not get upset by the 911 arrival and trample her. DO NOT RIDE ALONE. I can say honestly, I have not always taken my own advice, but DO NOT RIDE ALONE. I had broken my back in a car accident, and as soon as allowed, was back in the saddle, or to be honest, bareback. There were plenty of people around the stable, but they went to lunch. I went to dismount, and my back locked. I could not get either leg to swing over, and was stuck on that horse. I knew it might be three hours before anyone came back. I asked the horse to come up under an eave of the barn, held on and asked him to walk out from under me and plopped to the ground. It was my fault, the minute they told me they were going to lunch, and I would be alone, I should have dismounted. I at least had the sense to ride an old, super well trained horse my first time out after a back injury. BUT, I should NOT have been riding alone, even in the stable. Many the times horses have come in alone, and I have had to saddle up and go looking for someone..........at least they had made sure someone was there to miss them if the horse came in alone. Please, DO NOT RIDE ALONE. or at least let someone know where you are going, so when the horse comes in alone, they can go find you.
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  2. jst4horses
    I know a lot of riders will squal, scream, shout, swear. I use a cell phone when out on the trail, and even in the stable. I heard a sound, knew it was not good, and with a bad heart, not supposed to run, ran down and found a young barrel rider completely flat on the ground having had a horrible top speed fall. I called 911. I went in to see if I could do anything before they arrived AFTER securing the horse so he did not get upset by the 911 arrival and trample her. DO NOT RIDE ALONE. I can say honestly, I have not always taken my own advice, but DO NOT RIDE ALONE. I had broken my back in a car accident, and as soon as allowed, was back in the saddle, or to be honest, bareback. There were plenty of people around the stable, but they went to lunch. I went to dismount, and my back locked. I could not get either leg to swing over, and was stuck on that horse. I knew it might be three hours before anyone came back. I asked the horse to come up under an eave of the barn, held on and asked him to walk out from under me and plopped to the ground. It was my fault, the minute they told me they were going to lunch, and I would be alone, I should have dismounted. I at least had the sense to ride an old, super well trained horse my first time out after a back injury. BUT, I should NOT have been riding alone, even in the stable. Many the times horses have come in alone, and I have had to saddle up and go looking for someone..........at least they had made sure someone was there to miss them if the horse came in alone. Please, DO NOT RIDE ALONE. or at least let someone know where you are going, so when the horse comes in alone, they can go find you.
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    1. autumnap
      autumnap
      All good advice. Take care out there!
      Log in to reply.

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