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Julian's Life Story of His Path to Competition
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Julian's Life Story of His Path to Competition

I just want to tell a story made out of true events, and 100% as it happened. This is the story of Julian Johansen, a true horse friend.

There was once a boy named Julian Becker Johansen. When he was 14 years old, he had riding lessons at a handicapped riding school near Bægmarksbro in Denmark. He rose on a Gelden who's name was Hugo, a black and white pinto draft horse, used to give riding lessons.

The horse Hugo and Julian got so good friends, that when Julian came in the stable, and said "Hello Hugo!," Hugo would respond with a "Viiihihihihie." You see, Julian and Hugo had a special connection.

Every time something felt wrong in Hugo's back on their riding lessons, Hugo told Julian so with his feelings, and Julian would do what he could to change the way he sat on Hugo's back. However, there was a huge issue in that since the riding instructor had other thoughts how to sit on a horse. She instructed Julian to: tighten the reins, hold your hands as if you were holding a cup of coffee or tea, legs in to the horse, sit straight and not like a bag of potato's, heels down, relax shoulders. When the instructor looked away, Julian would do as Hugo told him: legs a little more off my flanks, relax, lean forward a little, not that tight with the reins.

Julian thought they talked together with their minds, as it was like he could hear Hugo's voice inside his head; Hugo's voice was a deep gentle voice. At that time, Julian had no understanding of horse anatomy and did not know it was just because Julian was picking up on Hugo's feelings, and that as humans use words, horses use their body to convey their feelings.

As Julian grew up, he kept talking abut how he could ''talk'' with horses with his mind.

Later, Julian found himself at another riding school near Aarhus in Denmark called Skaade Riding Klub. He helped people groom their horses, clean their hooves, and saddle and bridle the horses. He became friends with a old women called Vivian Hell, whose horse was named Kelly. Kelly was often angry about being groomed in specific spots on his back, and would sometimes kick even at Julian who got to be friends with Kelly as Kelly had taken a liking to Julian.

One day, a vet finally found a reason why Kelly always was angry and kicked when brushed in those spots. Kelly had muscle rheumatism and in Denmark, there was no cure for that in horses. The vet recommended Kelly to be allowed to "sleep in" or in other words, be put to sleep and never wake up again.

Julian could not allow this without trying to do something before it was too late. He convinced Vivian that there had to be another solution and to please wait with making her decision. Vivian loved her horse but did not want him to suffer in pain. She agreed to Julian's request and put her faith in him to come up with an alternative. Julian's mom, Hanne Johansen, used a vet who had been educated in Germany. This vet revealed that there was indeed a cure for muscle rheumatism but it was illegal in Denmark. The cure existed for dogs in Germany meaning it would not completely cure Kelly either but it could at least remove the pain for a period of time every time he was given the medicine. Julian told Vivian of this vet that knew of this cure. Vivian decided to give it a try and the medicine was expensive. They tried it for some months and to their surprise it worked wonders!

Julian had saved Kelly's life. Now Kelly could live on and enjoy the fields but not being ridden anymore, just enjoying his old days as any horse should have the opportunity to do.

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  1. Alexandra L
    Alexandra L
    I Iove this! Thank God there are people like Julian who have the courage to listen to their horses!
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    1. cumunicationviafeelings
      yes that was me... my account have sadly been susspended some time laiter after i posted this post becouse of seveal attempts to post abute how bits have harmed horses and not shuld be used, and actuely is a tool of torture in its moute... its not something many think abute, and most reget that at all could be reality. but considering the studie so many experts have done now a day, here among the well knowen Dr.robert Cook's 60 years of studie, so is it no dubt a reality that bits no matter how well its used, how soft the bit is, how well it fit, how soft the hands pulling the reins is, so IS the bit a fact of pain, meaning its not controling the horse troug the friendship betwing that horse and the rider, but is simpel control via pain... if you taik a horses skull, a appel, and a normal knife used to put things on bread, and try do the following, you will be abel to get a better undestanding of how sever it actuely is with a bit... first, you taik the knife, and cut with its back side in the appel, then draw the apple along that lower jaw of the skull at the point where the bit would sit. you will see the mark is almost the same... now consider this. the only thing thats betwing that lower jaw, and the bit is??? the the gums! and thise gums is all wired with nerves, wich can bring a hell lot of pain under pressur. pressur thats done of the bit, and thise nerves does (each time the bit press them over thise lower jaw) sent those signals of pain up to the horses brain, and thus the horse learn that the pain is removed by the rider by turning the head... what does this make the bit left as? a tool of pain, meaning its control via pain, and thus of the cost of both the rider and the horse.... a recap of many experts studie's say's now a day 'a bit is the couse of seveal of the issues we hear of still today that there is with horses. some of thise are, rearing, flight or fight responds, tricker fear behavior, bucking, bitting in the walls, or on the things outside the doorstabel to its box, and up to 500 oder issues' Dr. robet cook quet 'thise problems could easylig be dealth with by removing the bit, and the bit is more a danger then a safety... if your out on the horse, and the horse spook, and you typicaly pull in the reins to stop the horse, the horse will more likely tricker the fight or flight respond, becouse the horse in doing so, feeling the pain in its moute on top of that, be convinced the (whatever that spook it) still is after in. it cant fight it, so it will flight. now if you remove the bit, the horse will still spook, but it wont be pained in it moute when you pull in the reins, but just feel a toch around its head, and hear a rider gendel talk to it and calm it. so the horse would then could lissing, becouse it did not feel pain' my own imput to this alexandra is, that it would be best to start on the ground. meaning if your riding with bits or had done so to start with thugether with your currant horse, it would be best you start over from the beginning on the ground, let it be free from riding for some weeks or even month, and focus mainly on the relationship on the ground for a time. and then one day, you try out on the feild without any tack at all, to sit up a little, asking the horse if its okay, not just doing it becouse of any riget to do so, or becouse that what you feel like to do riget now, but is gaining the horse's permition as the friend it is to do so, and also learn to be more aware of when its time to get down again... that if ofcouse frienship at all its your main intrest with your horse. if results, compatitions, wining medals, mony, fame or whatever, is your goal with horses, then sure the torture tools is the riget way for ''quick results'', but does not give the -best- results.
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      1. Admin
        Admin
        Thank you for adding your thoughts to the conversation. We hope to encourage as much care be taken with spelling, grammar, and punctuation in future comments as is seen in posts throughout the site. This will ensure that everyone can enjoy the conversation with ease. Thanks!
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