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Emotion Treatments
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Emotion Treatments

Horses have very similar emotions than people, and the psychology of this animal when trying to train it is just as important as for a human who wants to be an integral part of society. Therefore, to learn how to help balance your horse is feeling is an important part of its training.

First, let’s define emotion. It is the physiological and mental reaction or state that comes with feelings, thoughts and behavior. They can be good or bad, and humans as well as animals behave according to how they feel.

Just like us, horses also have what is called behavioral patterns. This means that the same situation will often, if not usually, trigger the same emotion or range of emotions. If they react negatively to something that isn’t supposed to trigger that reaction, then their emotions are out of balance – like when horses spook at something as silly as a flower, which is called an intuitive reaction. Sometimes it is learned, like when a horse becomes afraid of being tied because an owner would whip it every time he or she tied the horse.

There are ways to change destructive patterns of emotions. First, of course, one must investigate to discover what the stimuli, or trigger, is. If you discover that it is just a normal reaction, then this is good behavior: it is a release of a negative emotion at the right time. If the horse (or human, or other pets) is not allowed to let it out, it could lead to emotional and even physical pain, at times developing into disease. A trauma can end up being stored in the cells because it is just too painful to be dealt with immediately; we see this sometimes with victims of childhood rape or sexual abuse from a family member. How many times have we heard that someone finally came out and spoke about it 20 or 30 years after it occurred?

Essential oils can help with the release of these emotions. These oils are absorbed very easily through the skin – rubbed on or consumed, depending on the oil - and are carried through the blood stream quickly. They work at stimulating the amygdale in the brain, which is the spot where emotions are managed. These oils then safely release the emotions we need to let go of. This can then help increase memory, concentration, discipline, and aid in many more areas of life.

You can pick several oils to use on a daily basis, switch them around or use the same, depending on what you need. You can simply smell them; no need to make things any more complex than that. You do need to observe your horse and other animals if you will be using the oils on them as they do not explain to you how they feel (don’t we all wish they would, though?). Please ensure your animal likes the smell, too; nothing is worse than making a pet whiff something it hates every day. This may not stop the healing process, but since there are many scents to choose from for different ailments, you can swap for another easily. You can even check and see if it works better depending on which nostril is favoured, too.

Now, it’s not always easy to guess which feeling your pet is dealing with, so you might need to stick to categories instead. Just remember that this does absolutely no harm if they are exposed for just a short time, and the worse that can happen is you’ll give them a headache if they are exposed too long. Read about this more online if you need more information.

I will only mention a few oils of the hundreds that are available. You can do your own search when you have the time.

Depression/Shock/Grief

• Rosewood

• Geranium

• Frankincense

• Sandalwood

• Orange Blossom

• Ylang Ylang

• Bergamot

• Coriander

Anger/Rage/Hate

• Bergamot

• Ylang Ylang

• Geranium

• Rosewood

• Lemon

• Jasmine Absolute

• Roman Chamomile

• Rose Otto

• Mandarin

• Palmarosa

• Coriander

Abuse/Abandonment Issues

• Lavender

• Sandalwood

• Valerian

• Lavender

• Spruce

• Geranium

• Helichrysum

• Rose Otto

• Davana

• Limette

Courage/Confidence

• Frankincense

• Ylang Ylang

• Clary Sage

• Cedarwood

• Jasmine Absolute

• Orange

• Idaho Tansy

• Juniper

• White Fir

All these oils will require carrier oil if you want to make a mix that will be used as a body lotion. The most famous carrier is almond, but at times other high quality oils, such as olive or grapeseed, will be recommended.

Notice also how several repeat themselves. This is normal; most herbs carry more than one health benefit.

 

 

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Leave a Comment

  1. Rene Wright
    Rene Wright
    Great blog & wonderful information. Most of these I can readily find nearby & I think in the near future I may try this on Cookie. :) Voted. Please check out my blogs: Moody Mares & Workout in the Mud & vote if you like them. Thanks! (I haven't blogged in a while so I'm making up for lost time. lol! )
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  2. jst4horses
    We are going to a healing at our church today for a dog with liver problems. He was a rescue, and since we are all practicing our healing because our trainer is coming in March we decided to bring the dog in to the healing mass and do a healing as well as pray with laying on of hands. I am going to forward your post to the owner as well, and suggest maybe she can do some research with her vet, who does some holistic healing, and find the correct oils to help heal this little dog.
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  3. Patriciasdream
    I enjoyed reading your blog. There is only one thing I would beg to differ with you about. It is that emotions are good / bad or positive or negative etc... Emotions in people and in horse are just that "emotions". Emotions have no meaning in and of themselves other than what we humans assign to them. For example if a horse is scared we interpret him to be spooky and a bad thing. The horse is just doing what it has been wired and / or conditioned to do. I know this may sound like splitting hairs but I believe it is an important point. Mainly because people (who have the ability to think and choose) need to I.D. their emotions when working with horses and choose the appropriate behaviors to elicit the appropriate responses (calmness, assertiveness etc...) in the horse. Horses on the other hand live in the moment and have no agendas. They do not choose but instead react to stimuli. If we label behavior as good / bad / positive or negative......we are more likely to respond in kind. I believe we humans should stay emotionally neutral....don't label or judge horses emotions.....but instead see them as ones we want to keep or ones we want to change.
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